The Basics of the Atom with Dr. Natasha Bajema, AOMD Podcast Episode 004

In this episode, Dr. Natasha Bajema kicks off her first episode of Nuclear 101 for Writers, Students and Technology Nerds. This segment is called “The Basics of the Atom.” At the end of this segment, you’ll understand some basic terminology, the structure of the atom, the importance of neutrons and isotopes, the key starting ingredient for nuclear weapons, and the first reason why it’s so hard to develop bomb material.

Interview with Brad Taylor, AOMD Podcast Episode 002

Dr. Natasha Bajema interviews New York Times Bestselling author Brad Taylor about his latest Book, Daughter of War, A Pike Logan Thriller. Brad also served for more than 21 years, retiring as a Special Forces Lieutenant Colonel. During that time he held numerous Infantry and Special Forces positions, including eight years in 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment – Delta where he commanded multiple troops and a squadron.

Interview with Dr. Andrew Maynard, AOMD Podcast Episode 001

Dr. Natasha Bajema kicks off the podcast with a fascinating discussion with Dr. Andrew Maynard. He is a Professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University, the mastermind behind the YouTube channel Risk Bites, and blogs at 2020science.org and most recently the author of Films from the Future: The Technology and Morality of Sci-Fi Movies.

My Goals in 2020: The Start of A New Decade

Saying goodbye to a decade… Each year since I first started writing in 2016, I’ve reviewed my accomplishments for the past year and set new goals for the year (and maybe this time if I’m feeling really spunky, for a whole decade? Nah…). I’ve often heard it said that we tend to overestimate what we can accomplish in a year, but underestimate what we can achieve in ten years. I can’t wait to see what i’ve done when I reach my ten year writing anniversary in 2026. Whereas I’ve only recently started writing fiction, I’ve accomplished plenty over the past Read more…

Day 79: Sneak Preview of Rescind Order

You wanted a sneak preview? First, a few words by way of introduction. And I promise, only a few. Definitely not 50K. Well, I didn’t “win” Nanowrimo month. In case you didn’t know, every November, hundreds of thousands of fiction authors commit to the goal of writing 50,000 words in one month. And not just any month. The month of November… which happens to feature fun with friends and family over Thanksgiving. I actually managed to pull this off twice before. Not this time. This year, I wrote 38,000 words on my latest novel, Rescind Order. I’m pretty proud of that word Read more…

Day 66: Wild Creatures are like Good Novel Characters

In Texas, we spend a great deal of time managing and living among wild creatures. SPOILER: they’re sometimes dangerous (ohh, danger), and they’re always bigger than anything I’ve seen elsewhere. Apparently, everything is bigger in Texas. At least that’s been my experience thus far. I’ve recently decided that wild creatures are like good characters in a novel. They make for great stories. WARNING: this post might contain disturbing material about dead creatures (specifically ones that i’ve killed).   Palmetto Bugs My fun with the wild creatures of Texas began when I received the proper “Welcome to Rockport, Texas” on my Read more…

Day 16: What Has Been Seen Cannot be Unseen

More than two weeks ago now, I announced my crazy intention of producing a musical stage play on nuclear weapons and artificial intelligence called American Doomsday. You can’t see me right now, but I’m laughing and shaking nervously. And asking myself, “wait, what?” In the meantime, I’ve started the novel that will serve as the basis for the stage play. I’ve been reflecting a great deal on what it means to write a story that is 1) compelling enough to attract a broad audience; 2) sufficiently faithful to the complex and technical topics of nuclear deterrence, the nuclear triad, false alarms, perception, Read more…

Day 1: An Idea is Born

I’ve often heard the phrase, timing is everything. After spending several decades on this planet, I’m inclined to agree. As a fiction writer and content creator, I get new ideas every day and can get excited about any number of them. Sadly, I don’t have the time, energy, or resources to execute them all. But I often wish I could see where all my ideas might lead–to explore whether or not they might work or have the effects I anticipate. But it’s not enough to have a good idea. Even successful execution of a good idea by the right person is not Read more…